Tue. Apr 23rd, 2019

Study Shows 69% Subscribe To Streaming Sports Service

“The survey says 47 percent of sports subscribers are “frustrated by the growing number of subscriptions and services they need to piece together to watch what they want.”

The number of consumers turning to digital streaming services is rising. As a consumer it’s only natural to follow your favorite content to its host.

For UFC it’s ESPN+, for Premiere League it’s NBC’s s Premiere League Pass, or even for the WWE’s own WWE Network. But say you enjoy all three. For an annual subscription you’ll pay just short of $230 for all three services. Tack on Netflix and any other niche subscriptions, such as the upcoming Disney+, and it all adds up.

This is all inspired by the latest Deloitte survey and how consumers take in digital content. The survey reports 69 percent of respondents subscribe to a digital streaming service. However, the survey leaves out products such as Playstation Vue or Youtube TV and other tradition TV streaming services, so it’s fair to assume that 69 percent number is actually much higher.

The survey says 47 percent of sports subscribers are “frustrated by the growing number of subscriptions and services they need to piece together to watch what they want.” So for example, a WWE fan needs a TV subscription to keep up with the weekly Monday NIght Raw and Tuesday’s SmackDown Live but needs the WWE Network to watch NXT and the monthly “pay-per-view” events such as April’s WrestleMania. But that same WWE fan is likely to have interest in other places to warrant more and more subscription services.

“With more than 300 over the top video options in the U.S., coupled with multiple subscriptions and payments to track and justify, consumers may be entering a time of ‘subscription fatigue,’” said Kevin Westcott, vice chairman and U.S. Telecom and Media and Entertainment leader, Deloitte LLP. “As media companies and content owners wrestle with how to retain and grow their subscriber base, they should not only continue to strengthen their content libraries, quality, distribution and value, but also keep a close eye on consumer frustrations, including advertising overload and data privacy concerns.”

In the end, it’s a process that will have to work itself out. If consumers have to pick and choose where they’ll allocate there $5-10 a month and some will get left out and have to rethink their strategy.